Is it any wonder traditional design is, once again, so beloved? In the hands of talented architects and designers, new homes that are inspired by the past are delivering the soul and updated livability we crave today. Case in point: this recently built Greek Revival style residence imagined and created by designer Hillary Taylor, architect Jon Jang, builder Evergreene Construction and Kappus landscape designer Simriti Schwobe. We’re smitten with the home’s historic character and breathtaking décor showcased in our feature story Time & Again. If you can’t get enough of this delightful estate, the following images offer more of it to savor. Enjoy the tour!

All photos by Lindsay Salazar

Photography by Lindsay Salazar

When imaging this home, the team considered what might have been built in this St. Marys neighborhood location if the early pioneers who came through Emigration Canyon had the funds to build a house in this spot when they arrived in Salt Lake City. They decided on a Greek Revival, which was a popular style of residential architecture from 1820-1850. The central portion of the exterior is constructed with stone selected from states located along the Pioneer Trail.

Photography by Lindsay Salazar

Architect Jon Jang devised a courtyard that would buffer street noise but also provide natural light on multiple sides of the rooms on this home. The reclaimed millstone fountain delivers the soft sound of moving water to the courtyard all summer long. 

Photography by Lindsay Salazar

The front door opens to the historically scaled entry. Deep, splayed window openings, thick walls and raised paneling deliver a sense of solidity and age to the space.

Photography by Lindsay Salazar

Antiques mix with reproductions in the elegant dining room, where Susan Harter wallpaper and a Dennis & Leen chandelier harken to the past.

Photography by Lindsay Salazar

The team designed the kitchen to look as if it were added on to the home over the years. Taylor incorporated reclaimed beams and Richard Marshall custom wood floors. “The floors really tell the story throughout the home and feel softly worn over 100 years versus rustic in an industrial way,” she explains.

Photography by Lindsay Salazar

“We wanted access to the outdoors directly from the kitchen and also to provide a casual dining space that could seat the family,” says Taylor, referring to the light-filled breakfast area. Seating includes a French neoclassic (Louis XVI) reproduction banquette teamed with traditional American Windsor chairs painted white to counter the surrounding stained-wood tones.

Photography by Lindsay Salazar

This working pantry focuses on function and includes an ice maker, dishwasher, dish storage and work space. Taylor adorned the hardworking room with classic style. “We wanted it a little more dressy since this is the space at the axis of the central enfilade of the home,” she explains. Brass accents, Nero Maquino marble and parquet floors dress the space in timeless beauty.

Photography by Lindsay Salazar

“The silk curtains were embroidered in England and incredibly fabricated by Dennah’s Draperies,” says Taylor, describing the primary bedroom’s window dressings. Diamond-patterned carpet from Stark adds depth and dimension to the space.

Photography by Lindsay Salazar

This beautiful bathroom tucks in the eaves of the home’s second level. “We saved the original Sherle Wagner sink fittings from the original home, and the amethyst levers informed the design of the entire bedroom suite,” Taylor says.  

Photography by Lindsay Salazar

Located at the back of the home, this gathering space opens onto all of the outdoor spaces in the backyard including a pear tree allee, inner courtyard dining area, pool terrace and sunken lawn. The reclaimed beams repeat from those featured in the kitchen and breakfast areas.

Photography by Lindsay Salazar

A charming second-level common area links the children’s bedrooms and provides a space for casual daily interactions. A window seat offers views of the landscape behind the home. Taylor used wallpaper to counterbalance the room’s abundant built-ins and paneling.

Photography by Lindsay Salazar

“Rather than adding a built-in seat in this angular alcove, Taylor chose a free-standing chaise that provides curved lines “that add contrast and bring energy to this hallway detail.” She adds, “The embroidered pillows are fresh and feel natural without being too feminine.”


Tour the entire home here.