A historical building that once housed air compression equipment for mining operations in Park City a century ago is the new home for Vilex, maker of orthopedic foot and ankle implants and devices. Situated in the Park City’s Silver Star development on the mountainside, the locale is quintessentially Park City in how it combines the history of mining with a ski lift and resort. The historical marker can be seen to the right of the entrance.

Vilex
Photo by Scot Zimmerman

Double doors lead to the sunny reception area with pairs of matching wing-backed chairs set against the partition created by the stairway. The ceiling is open through the second level with a chandelier dropping to provide light. Greg Young Construction built the offices and K Rocke Interiors (Kristin Rocke) executed the interiors.

Vilex
Photo by Scot Zimmerman

Consistent with the open industrial look of exposed venting and structural supports, the metal- paned glass door leading to the conference room is top-hung on exposed rollers.

Vilex
Photo by Scot Zimmerman

The partial timbering of the conference room lowers the scale to one more appropriate to the function of the room The chairs alternate a gray-black-and-white tweedy fabric that corresponds to the wall treatment opposite the windows and the red of the company logo.

Photo by Scot Zimmerman

Still on the lower floor, to the rear are a series of high-backed well-cushioned benches that frame collaboration areas. The industrial windows look out to the aspen trees on the hillside as a vivid reminder of the office’s Park City slope-side location.

Vilex
Photo by Scot Zimmerman

The top floor is the site of the company’s training and education programs directed toward familiarizing surgical teams with procedures for implanting Vilex orthopedic devices and products. Here is a long bar with stools serves as a break-out space or a place for lunch or refreshments.

Vilex
Photo by Scot Zimmerman

Beyond the bar and stools is the training space. I have to admit, that hearing the term training room, I think of being uncomfortable in hard metal and wooden seating. Not here. A horseshoe of sectionals and tables surround the presenters and promote face-to-face conversation between the attendees. K Rocke’s approach to furnishings seems to always have comfort on the top of the list of considerations.

Photo by Scot Zimmerman

This is one of the most interesting parts of the design, and it requires a little explaining. Between the two corner executive offices is this seating space, separated by glass walls. It invites quieter and more private conversations between the partners and with clients. You will note the bull in the artwork. One of the executives was once a rodeo cowboy. I have to think that he is someone who understands pain, injuries and orthopedic repairs! My family has deep roots in Summit County, and it really pleases me to see preservation of
historical buildings in Park City, especially buildings that continue to be living and a useful part of community life.


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