I felt the promise of Spring last week. I had the chance to drive up to Promontory, a private resort community east of Park City, where I enjoyed grand views in every direction, mild temperatures, and the relaxed pace of the resort. The golf courses were snowy, but my hunch is not for too much longer. The homeowners were just settling into their new home, built by Upland Development (Ryan and Jesica Taylor) and designed by Park City stalwarts Otto-Walker Architects. Ryan Taylor worked with the homeowners to select the finishes.

Promontory, Upland Development, Ryan and Jessica Taylor, Park City, Otto-Walker Architects

The home’s configuration maximizes the hilltop views from the upper level’s living space, and to assist with this, there are two garages. One is at grade for two cars with ease for unloading groceries by the kitchen and pantry. A second garage with two bays is at the lower level. 

Otto-Walker Architects, Upland Development, wood and glass door, pivot door, glass entryway, open-planned living area, wood coffee table, stone fireplace, neutral tone couch

A wood and glass pivot door surrounded by glass greets visitors at the entry, which leads to the open-planned living, dining and kitchen areas that connect to outdoor living with glass railings for no interruption to views.

Otto-Walker Architects, Upland Development, Park City, reclaimed beams, crystal chandeliers, glass shelving, open living, neutral color scheme
Otto-Walker Architects, Upland Development, Park City, reclaimed beams, crystal chandeliers, glass shelving, open living, neutral color scheme

Looking the opposite direction, this time from the entry, the home is transparent to the views. Establishing place in this way is one of the ways to recognize Otto-Walker architecture. I am showing both the daytime and evening views so you can appreciate the transformation of space’s mood from daytime to evening. Reclaimed beams and timber in portions of the ceiling are juxtaposed against the crystal chandeliers and cut glass shelving that melds rustic and sophisticated classic. 

Otto-Walker Architects, Upland Development, reclaimed lumber ceiling, white cabinetry, glass light fixtures, walk-through butler's pantry, kitchen island, open living

The reclaimed lumber ceiling continues through the kitchen, and ceiling clouds define the kitchen and dining areas. The white-painted cabinetry and glass light fixtures contribute to the continued sophisticated classic styling. To the left beyond the refrigerator is a walk-through butler’s pantry with a desk and computer that naturally functions as a household hub. A full pantry connects to the butler’s pantry. 

Otto-Walker Architects, Upland Development, reclaimed lumber ceiling, white cabinetry, glass light fixtures, walk-through butler's pantry, kitchen island, open living

This second kitchen photo makes it easier to appreciate the depth of the island and considerable workspace in the kitchen.

Otto-Walker Architects, Upland Development, master bedroom, window wall, glass patio railings, dark wood trim, forest green accents, Park City

The hilltop location makes it possible to have views in every direction, and the master bedroom’s windows capture them. As in the living area, the patio railings are glass to allow greater uninterrupted views to the outdoors.

Otto-Walker Architects, Upland Development, master bath, double-door shower, his and her vanity, gray color scheme bathroom, freestanding tub, marble countertops, Park City

Spaciousness marks the master bath with its large double-doored shower and his-and-her vanity with a well-considered glass cabinet and dressing-table feature.

Otto-Walker Architects, Upland Development, shiplap wall, modern stairway, hanging chandelier, hillside window, Park City

Along the stairs is another window with views to the hillsides behind the home. The shiplap wall treatment projects another classic touch. On the lower level is a family area, bar, fitness room and bedrooms.

The home was designed and built for comfortably serving guests and extended family. With COVID, the home seemed comfortable for two generations, the younger generation working remotely from the office and busy on laptops and headsets, and a visiting puppy, proving the point that its use meets the intention.

Photos by Scot Zimmerman

For more Photo Fridays, click here.